Advances in Decision Sciences (ADS)

Paper Submission

Submission

The journal’s policy is open access and creative commons. Authors retain their rights to republish this material in other works written or edited by them, subject to full acknowledgement of the original source of publication.

Please prepare your manuscript before submission, according to APA Manual 7th edition and using the following guidelines. Manuscripts should be submitted by ONLY one of the authors of the manuscript (corresponding author). Only electronic PDF (.pdf) and Word (.doc, .docx, .rtf) files can be submitted through the submission platform after proper registration. Research articles are suggested to be between 6,000-10,000 words. Review papers should not exceed 6,000 words. Submissions and communications by anyone other than the corresponding author will not be accepted. The corresponding author takes responsibility for the manuscript during submission, peer review and final publication of the manuscript.

Terms of Submission

Manuscripts must be submitted on the understanding that they have not been published elsewhere and are only being considered by this journal. The submitting author is responsible for ensuring that the article’s publication has been approved by all the other coauthors. It is also the submitting author’s responsibility to ensure that the article has all necessary institutional approvals. Only an acknowledgment from the editorial office officially establishes the date of receipt. Further correspondence and proofs will be sent to the author(s) before publication, unless otherwise indicated. It is a condition of submission that the authors permit editing of the manuscript for readability. All inquiries concerning the publication of accepted manuscripts should be addressed to wong@asia.edu.tw .

Peer Review

All manuscripts are subject to peer review and are expected to meet the standards of academic excellence. If approved by the editor, submissions will be considered by peer reviewers, whose identities will remain anonymous to the authors. Our Research Integrity team will occasionally seek advice outside standard peer review, for example, on submissions with serious ethical, security, biosecurity, or societal implications. We may consult experts and the academic editor before deciding on appropriate actions, including but not limited to: recruiting reviewers with specific expertise, assessment by additional editors, and declining to further consider a submission.

Concurrent Submissions

In order to ensure sufficient diversity within the authorship of the journal, authors will be limited to having two manuscripts under review at any point in time. If an author already has two manuscripts under review in the journal, they will need to wait until the review process of at least one of these manuscripts is complete before submitting another manuscript for consideration. This policy does not apply to Editorials or other non-peer reviewed manuscript types.

Units of Measurement

Units of measurement should be presented simply and concisely using the International System of Units (SI).

Article Types

The journal will consider the following article types:

Research Articles

Research articles should present the results of an original research study. These manuscripts should describe how the research project was conducted and provide a thorough analysis of the results of the project. Systematic reviews may be submitted as research articles.

Reviews

A review article provides an overview of the published literature in a particular subject area.

Supplementary Materials

Supplementary materials are the additional parts to a manuscript, such as audio files, video clips, or datasets that might be of interest to readers. Authors can submit one file of supplementary material along with their manuscript through the Manuscript Tracking System. If there is more than one file, they can be uploaded as a .ZIP file.

A section titled “Supplementary Material” should be included before the references list with a concise description for each supplementary material file. Supplementary materials are not modified by our production team. Authors are responsible for providing the final supplementary materials files that will be published along with the article.

Proofs

Corrected proofs must be returned to the publisher within two to three days of receipt. The publisher will do everything possible to ensure prompt publication.

Copyright and Permissions

Authors retain the copyright of their manuscripts, and all Open Access articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work is properly cited.

The use of general descriptive names, trade names, trademarks, and so forth in this publication, even if not specifically identified, does not imply that these names are not protected by the relevant laws and regulations. The submitting author is responsible for securing any permissions needed for the reuse of copyrighted materials included in the manuscript.

While the advice and information in this journal are believed to be true and accurate on the date of its going to press, neither the authors, the editors, nor the publisher can accept any legal responsibility for any errors or omissions that may be made. The publisher makes no warranty, express or implied, with respect to the material contained herein.

Conflicts of Interest

Conflicts of interest (COIs, also known as ‘competing interests’) occur when issues outside research could be reasonably perceived to affect the neutrality or objectivity of the work or its assessment. For more information, see our publication ethics policy. Authors must declare all potential interests – whether or not they actually had an influence – in a ‘Conflicts of Interest’ section, which should explain why the interest may be a conflict. If there are none, the authors should state “The author(s) declare(s) that there is no conflict of interest regarding the publication of this article.” Submitting authors are responsible for coauthors declaring their interests. Declared conflicts of interest will be considered by the editor and reviewers and included in the published article.

Authors must declare current or recent funding (including for Article Processing Charges) and other payments, goods or services that might influence the work. All funding, whether a conflict or not, must be declared in the “Funding Statement”. The involvement of anyone other than the authors who 1) has an interest in the outcome of the work; 2) is affiliated to an organization with such an interest; or 3) was employed or paid by a funder, in the commissioning, conception, planning, design, conduct, or analysis of the work, the preparation or editing of the manuscript, or the decision to publish must be declared.

FormatArticle files should be provided in Microsoft Word format. PDF files can be used if an accompanying  Microsoft Word format document is provided. PDF as a sole file type is not accepted, a PDF must be accompanied by the source file. Acceptable figure file types are listed further below.
Article lengthArticles should be 6,000-10,000 words in length. This includes all text including references and appendices. Please allow 280 words for each figure or table.
Article titleA title of not more than eight words should be provided.
Author detailsIn a separate file, include all contributing authors' names should be added to the submission, with their names arranged in the correct order for publication.
• Correct e-mail addresses should be supplied for each author in their separate author accounts
• The full name of each author must be present in their author account in the exact format they should appear for publication, including or excluding any middle names or initials as required
• The affiliation of each contributing author should be correct in their individual author account. The affiliation listed should be where they were based at the time that the research for the paper was conducted
Biographies and acknowledgementsAuthors who wish to include these items should save them together in an MS Word file to be uploaded with the submission. If they are to be included, a brief professional biography of not more than 100 words should be supplied for each named author.
Structured abstractAuthors must supply a structured abstract in their submission, set out under 4-7 sub-headings (see our "How to... write an abstract" guide for practical help and guidance):
• Purpose (mandatory)
• Design/methodology/approach (mandatory)
• Findings (mandatory)
• Research limitations/implications (if applicable)
• Practical implications (if applicable)
• Social implications (if applicable)
• Originality/value (mandatory)
Maximum is 250 words in total (including keywords and article classification, see below).
Authors should avoid the use of personal pronouns within the structured abstract and body of the paper (e.g. "this paper investigates..." is correct, "I investigate..." is incorrect).
KeywordsAuthors should provide appropriate and short keywords in the submission that encapsulate the principal topics of the paper (see the How to... ensure your article is highly downloaded guide for practical help and guidance on choosing search-engine friendly keywords). The maximum number of keywords is 12.
HeadingsHeadings must be concise, with a clear indication of the distinction between the hierarchy of headings.
The preferred format is for first level headings to be presented in bold format and subsequent sub-headings to be presented in medium italics.
Notes/endnotesDo NOT use notes or endnotes.
FiguresAll Figures (charts, diagrams, line drawings, web pages/screenshots, and photographic images) should be submitted in electronic form included in the manuscript following APA Manual 7th edition.. 
TablesAll Tables should be submitted in the electronic form included in the manuscript following APA Manual 7th edition. Ensure that any superscripts or asterisks are shown next to the relevant items and have corresponding explanations displayed as notes to the table, figure or plate.
ReferencesReferences to other publications must be in APA Manual 7th edition style and carefully checked for completeness, accuracy and consistency. This is very important in an electronic environment because it enables your readers to exploit the Reference Linking facility on the database and link back to the works you have cited through CrossRef.

Invert all authors’ names; give surnames and initials for up to and including seven authors. When authors number eight or more, include the first six authors’ names, then insert three ellipsis points, and add the last author’s name. For example:

Gilbert, D. G., McClernon, J. F., Rabinovich, N. E., Sugai, C., Plath, L. C., Asgaard, G., … Botros, N. (2004). Effects of quitting smoking on EEG activation and attention last for more than 31 days and are more severe with stress, dependence, DRD2 A 1 allele, and depressive traits. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 6, 249–267. doi:1 0.1 080/1462220041 0001676305.

For references with the same surname and initials but different first name provide the first name as follows:
• Janet, P. [Paul]. (1876). La notion de la personnalité [The notion of personality]. Revue Scientifique, 10, 574–575.
• Janet, P. [Pierre]. (1906). The pathogenesis of some impulsions. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 1, 1–17.

Text citation to be given as follows: (Paul Janet, 1876) (Pierre Janet, 1906)

For references of two or more primary authors with the same surname, include the first author's initials in all text citations, even if the year of publication differs.

• Light, I. (2006). Deflecting immigration: Networks, markets, and regulation in Los Angeles. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation.
• Light, M. A., & Light, I. H. (2008). The geographic expansion of Mexican immigration in the United States and its implications for local law enforcement. Law Enforcement Executive Forum Journal, 8, 73–82.

Examples of text citation: Among studies, we review M.A. Light and Light (2008). I. Light (2006) studies this concept.

If two references of more than three surnames with the same year shorten to the same form e.g. both Ireys, Chernoff, DeVet, & Kim, 2001, and Ireys, Chernoff, Stein, DeVet, & Silver, 2001 shorten to Ireys et al., 2001)

Then cite the surnames of the first authors and of as many of the subsequent authors as necessary to distinguish the two references, followed by a comma and et al.:
Ireys, Chernoff, DeVet, et al. (2001) and Ireys, Chernoff, Stein, et al. (2001)
• Do not include personal communications, such as letters, memoranda, and informal electronic communications in references but do cite these in the text. Examples of a citation of personal communication are: (V. G. Nguyen, personal communication, September 28, 1999); T. K. Lutes (personal communication, April 18, 2001).

Use Arabic numerals even if some volume numbers of books and journals are given in roman numerals (e.g. Vol. 3 not Vol. III).
Examples of references: Journals:• Burns, P. (2002a). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(7), 55–73.
• Burns, P. (2002b). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(September), 55–73.
• Burns, P. (2002). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(Autumn), 55–73.
• Burns, P. (in press-a). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(7), 55–73.
• Burns, P., & Johanson, R. (Eds.). (2002). The intergovernmental regime: A public policy in Hartford, Connecticut. Journal of Urban Affairs, 24(7), 55–73.
Books:• Alexander, C. F. (1996). The theory and practice of Ku Klux Klan in the southwest. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press.
• Alexander, C. F. (1996). The theory and practice of Ku Klux Klan in the southwest [Brochure]. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press.
• American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). (2002). Statement on auditing standards no. 99: Consideration of fraud in a financial audit. New York, NY: AICPA.
• Arnold, M. B. (1960). Emotion and personality: Psychological aspects (2nd ed., pp. 34–48). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.
• Merriam-Webster’s collegiate dictionary (10th ed.). (1993). London: Merriam-Webster.
• Citation: (Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 1993).
Edited Books:• Bridges, A., Burns, B., & Cash, A. (1989). Becoming an American: The working classes in the United States before the Civil War. In I. Katezelson & A. Zolvo (Eds.), Working class formation: A subject class (2nd ed., Vol. 6, pp. 110–125). Princeton, NJ: Wiley.
• Bridges, A., & Burns, B. (with Cash, C. A.) (1989). Becoming an American: The working classes in the United States before the Civil War. In I. Katezelson (Ed.), Working class formation: A subject class (2nd ed., Vol. 6, pp. 110–125). London: City University.
• Bridges, A., Burns, B., & Cash, A. (Eds.). (1989). Becoming an American: The working classes in the United States before the Civil War. In Working class formation: A subject class (2nd ed., Vol. 6, p. 125). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
• Simmel, G. (1950). The stranger. In K. Wolff (Ed. & Trans.), The sociology of Georg Simmel. New York, NY: Free Press (Original work published in 1908).
PHD Thesis• Lowe, R. (1967). Racial segregation in Indiana. Ph.D. thesis, Ball State University, Munice, IN, USA.
Dissertation• Sinaceur, M. (2006). Suspending judgments to create value: Suspicion, distrust and trust in negotiations. Dissertation, Stanford University
Proceedings• Chalmers, D. (1965). Becoming an American in today’s world. In I. Katezelson (Ed.), Proceedings of the 4th international conference meeting, Bronx, Germany (pp. 1–27).
Unpublished data• Chalmers, D. (1965). Racial segregation in Indiana. Unpublished data. Department of Biotechnology, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Translation• John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). Article title in German. Journal name in German. [Translation of Journal Name in English.], 47, 1–10.
Book Translation• John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). In H. Johanson & K. Mark (Trans.), Book name in French (pp. 1–20). [Book name in English.] Place: Publisher
Book Series• John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). Article title. In T. Monste (Ed.), Book name. Book Title Series. Place: Publisher
Technical Report• Bonn, M. (2000). Racial segregation in Indiana. Technical Report no. 29876765. University of Wisconsin, WI, USA.
• Author, A. (2001). Article title. Technical Report. Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin 1897287. University of Wisconsin, WI, USA.
• Armstrong, J., Deeble, J., Dror, D. M., Rice, N., Thiede, M., & Van de Ven, W. P. M. M. (2004, February 16). The International Review Panel report to the South African Risk Equalization Fund Task Group. Retrieved from http://www.medicalschemes.com/publications/publications.aspx?catid=23. Accessed on March 9, 2007.
• Armstrong, J., Deeble, J., & Dror, D. M. (2004, February 16). The International Review Panel report to the South African Risk Equalization Fund Task Group. Retrieved from http://www.medicalschemes.com/publications/publications.aspx?catid=23. Accessed on March 9
Working paper, mimeo, discussion paper• John, A. (2000). Article title. Working Paper No. 1897287. University of Wisconsin, WI.
• John, A. (2001). Article title. Working Paper. Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin 1897287. University of Wisconsin, WI.
• Bonn, M. (2000). Racial segregation in Indiana. Discussion paper. University of Wisconsin, WI.
Paper presented• John, A., Williams, R., & Monste, E. (2000). Value and the world economy today. Paper presented at the International Association of Conflict Management, Seville, Spain.
• Wang, C. S., Phillips, K. W., Loyd, D. L., & Lount, R. B., Jr. (2005). The conflict between how we feel and how we think: Affective and cognitive reactions to disagreement from socially similar and dissimilar others. Paper presented at Academy of Management, Honolulu, HI.
Newspaper article• New York Times. (1980). Article title. New York Times, June 12, p. 168.
John, R. (1990). Article title. New York Times, June 12, p. 45.
Manuscript submitted• Smith, P. K., & Bargh, J. A. (2004). Nonconscious effects of power on basic approach and avoidance tendencies. Manuscript submitted for publication.
• Young, R. C., Keltner, D., Londahl, E. A., Capps, L. M., & Tauer, J. T. (1999). The pleasures of talking trash: Development, social status, and teasing. Unpublished manuscript.
URL• ČTK. (2005). Middle class would pay for ODS plan, November 29. Retrieved from http://www.prague.st/upload_ctk/articles/czech-ods-reforms-reactions-pr…. Accessed on January 2008.
• Armstrong, J., Deeble, J., & Dror, D. M. (2004, February 16). The International Review Panel report to the South African Risk Equalization Fund Task Group. Retrieved from http://www.medicalschemes.com/publications/publications.aspx?catid=23. Accessed on March 9.
• Arnold, M. B. (1960). Emotion and personality: Psychological aspects (2nd ed., pp. 34–48). New York, NA: Columbia University Press. Retrieved from http://www.medicalschemes.com/publications/publications.aspx?catid=23
• Van Nuys, D. (Producer). (2007, December 19). Shrink rap radio [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from http://www.shrinkrapradio.com/
DOI• Schiraldi, G. R. (2001). The post-traumatic stress disorder sourcebook: A guide to healing, recovery, and growth [Adobe Digital Editions version]. doi:10.1036/0071393

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